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Lindfield Scenes

The pretty West Sussex village of Lindfield has a fascinating history. Its High Street follows an ancient north-south track that has existed for thousands of years, long before the Romans built a major road a mile to the west of the village.

First appearing as Lindefeldia, ‘open land with lime trees’, in a Saxon charter of 765 AD, in which King Ealdwulf granted lands for the building of a Minster church, by Domesday the lands were held by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

King Edward III recognised the importance of medieval Lindfield and in 1343 granted the town a royal charter to hold a market every Thursday and two annual eight day fairs. For centuries the fairs continued each April and August with the summer fair becoming one of the largest sheep sales in Sussex.

Lindfield was once part of the thriving Wealden iron industry. As early as 1539, William Levett of Buxted, a county curate with a thriving sideline in iron and armaments, was recorded as extracting iron ore at Lindfield. Later the Henslowe family of Lindfield were actively engaged in the iron milling business in association with Ralph Hogge, parson Levett's former servant and later a majorironmaster in his own right.

In 1841 the London-Brighton railway opened, passing to the west of the parish with a ‘Station for Cuckfield and Lindfield Towns’ on open land that was to become the town of Haywards Heath. The construction of the Ouse Valley branch line reached Lindfield in 1866 with a proposed station to the north of All Saints’ Church but the line was abandoned for financial reasons.

Charles Eamer Kempe, a leading church stained glass designer and manufacturer lived at Lindfield until his death in 1907. Kempe renovated and redocorated an Elizabethan manor house near the village which he renamed Old Place, from where he entertained clients and professional partners.

I'm working on a set of Lindfield scenes, all of which will be exhibitted at the Toll House Gallery.


Here are the first four, now on display and for sale at £140 each, mounted and framed or £40 as a mounted, ready to frame, print.

 

                    

 

     

 

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